Apache Community Track

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Tuesday 09:30 UTC
Apache Software Foundation and The Apache Way (in Hindi language) [ALC Indore]
Swapnil M Mane

This talk will be part of Track prepared by ALC Indore, and *language for the talk will be Hindi*. In this session, will speak about Apache Software Foundation, and about the Apache Way. # Apache Software Foundation -- History -- Projects -- How Apache project works? -- Apache Project Ecosystem # The Apache Way -- Community - over code -- Merit - recognizing your work -- Communication - how communities communicate -- Open Development -- Decision Making - Consensus

An open-source enthusiast, and promoter. -- Apache Software Foundation Member -- Apache Central Services / Editorial Member -- Founder & Chair, Apache Local Community (ALC) -- PMC Member, Apache Community Development, OFBiz, Roller -- Founder Vue.js Indore community Skilled in E-commerce, Order Management System, Omni-Channel, and PWA strategy. Strong information technology professional with the intensive experience of building enterprise-grade applications.

Tuesday 10:10 UTC
InnerSource updates in China
Jerry Tan

There are more and more projects donated to Apache foundation from China in recent years. So more engineers are familiar with Apache Way. InnerSource is adopting Apache Way with an organization. And then More companies are beginning their InnerSource Journey. In this talk, I will give a brief update of InnerSource adoption in China, including some company's practices. Some are using it to build engineer culture, some are using it as a tool to remove duplicate wheels. InnerSource is a long journey, but I am happy to see that Chinese companies are more willing to embrace Open Source more deeply.

Committer of apache.org, mozilla.org, gnome.org PPMC of apache brpc incubating project, InnerSourceCommon Foundation member, InnerSource advocator in China, more than 20 years of Open Source Experience

Tuesday 10:50 UTC
Apache Pulsar: a borderless community
Jennifer Huang

Apache Pulsar is an open-source distributed pub-sub messaging system originally created at Yahoo and now part of the Apache Software Foundation(ASF). It is a multi-tenant, high-performance solution for server-to-server messaging. After graduation from ASF, the community grows bigger and stronger, with more and more users and contributors. This presentation shares how Apache Pulsar develops a borderless community in a short period.

Jennifer Huang is an Apache Pulsar committer and a senior technical writer at StreamNative. She contributes to Apache Pulsar documentation and community development proactively. She is dedicated to growing the Apache Pulsar community globally.

Tuesday 16:15 UTC
The Apache Way
Kevin A. McGrail

The Apache Way is how the Apache Software Foundation works. It's a collection of tribal knowledge and stories that loosely define how we work. Not all of it is intuitive but it does work. In 21 years we have changed the way computing around the world happens through our mission to provide open source software to the world and doing so at no charge! Want to work more effectively with the foundation? Want to model our leadership? Want to bring a new project under our umbrella? Come learn more about the Apache Way! Kevin A. McGrail has served in a number of roles at the foundation as member, as a chairperson, in the incubator, as a mentor, in the treasury and in fundraising. He will talk about his experience and some of the mistakes he's made too.

Kevin A. McGrail Director of Business Growth, InfraShield https://www.linkedin.com/in/kmcgrail, kmcgrail@infrashield.com Kevin A. McGrail, aka KAM, is Director of Business Growth @ InfraShield.com doing cyberphysical security for critical infrastructure. Kevin loves Open Source Software and is a member of the Apache Software Foundation. He is a cyber security and privacy expert, and his research protects millions of Internet users every day. He is an advisor for SecurityUniversity.edu & Virtru.com as well as a Director at the Dysautonomia Support Network and The McGrail Foundation. His latest honor is becoming a member of the U.S. Marine Corps Cyber Auxiliary. Kevin has spoken all over the United States and worldwide in Canada, Germany, Belgium, Sweden & China on Open Source Software, the Cloud & Cybersecurity.

Tuesday 16:55 UTC
Open Source changes the world!
Bertrand Delacretaz

In a world that's increasingly digital, Open Source software is everywhere: in your phone, your elevator, your car, behind your bank account...more than ever, Open Source is at the heart of our world. Beyond these very concrete contributions to our society's well being, Open Source communities have also helped design innovative collaboration techniques, especially around remote and distributed work. Often running without a formal boss and without a formal schedule, Open Source communities consistently produce software that's of great quality, sometimes world-changing. COVID-19 has prompted many companies and organizations to speed up their transition to digital transformation and distributed collaboration. This talk will show what Open Source communities can bring to this new world, based on a number of concrete example where simple tools and techniques make all the difference in terms of digital and remote collaboration.

Bertrand Delacretaz works as a Principal Scientist for Adobe in Basel, Switzerland. He's involved in software design and development for Adobe Experience Cloud products, which use many open source modules, mostly from Apache projects to which his teams contribute extensively. Bertrand is currently (2020-2021) on his eleventh term as a member of the Apache Software Foundation's Board of Directors and has been active in the Foundation for about 20 years.

Tuesday 17:35 UTC
Teaching Open Source
Daniel Ruggeri

How did you learn about Open Source? Did you learn from a mentor? Did you learn from a colleague? Did you learn through hard fought experience? For a lot of us, we learned the hard way. But... what if all of the concepts, the tools, the licensing, the methods, and the terms were gathered into a course? Come join our presenter as he walks through his motivations and experience designing and teaching a college-level course about Open Source. We will discuss how to get started, what the curriculum includes, how you could deliver such a course, and other tips and tricks.

Daniel is Vice President of Middleware at Mastercard and an Open Source evangelist. Responsible for setting the direction of Mastercard regarding the Web and Cloud space, he spends his days and nights playing with infrastructure and the code that powers it both inside the firewall and outside. He is a member of the Apache Software Foundation and has contributed code to Open Source projects from simple pet projects to widely utilized servers. As a lover of Open Source, he even taught a course about Open Source Software Development (and will share the curriculum with you!). He has spoken at several conferences about expanding Open Source in enterprises, introducing Open Source, and growing understanding of Open Source in education.

Tuesday 18:15 UTC
From no open source experience to Apache Member and PMC of Commons
Rob Tompkins

Between 2016 and 2019 I went from having not made any Apache contributions to being on the PMC of Apache Commons. I will tell my story here and give insights about how the Apache Way works. This talk has been previously given at the DC Apache Roadshow with a positive response.

I am a software developer and mathematician from Richmond, Virginia who happens to be an Apache Member and am on the PMC of Apache Commons. I also particularly enjoy outdoor adventure sports for those interested.

Tuesday 18:55 UTC
The Myth of Culture
Ken Coar

In today's increasingly connected world, the word "culture" appears in communities a lot. Unfortunately, it's not a single-value term. In many cases the founders of a culture are unaware of how their ideals have morphed, and acquired altered or additional definitions. In this talk I intend to describe some of the factors that contribute to this sort of 'fuzzing' of consensual understanding of the term.

Ken Coar, an open sourcerer and opinionist, has written code for 40+ years. He was one of the founders of The Apache Software Foundation, served on its board of directors for years, and was responsible for the ApacheCon conferences for several years as well. He also served on the board of the Open Source Initiative. Currently he prefers to write code in Ruby, but has contributed to rubygems, CPAN, PHP, and Apache httpd.

Tuesday 19:35 UTC
The State of D&I at the ASF
Anita Sarma, Daniel Izquierdo, Griselda Cuevas, Mariam Guizani

In this talk we'll talk about the research efforts the D&I committee has been working on for the past year. We'll talk with our researchers and will deep dive into the insights and results we obtained from the three phases of our work: The ASF Community Survey, the D&I research interviews and our quantitative analysis with Bitergia's technology. We'll also have an opportunity to ask questions to the researchers and the team behind this effort.

Anita Sarma
Anita Sarma is an Associate Professor at Oregon State University. Before this she was an Assistant Professor at University of Nebraska, Lincoln; a post-doctoral scholar at Carnegie Mellon University, and a doctoral student at University of California, Irvine. Through this journey her passion has been on helping humans make better software and work together. A primary focus of her research is in facilitating onboarding of newcomers and increasing diversity in open source projects. Overall, Dr. Sarma’s research has resulted in more than 100 peer-reviewed publications an several best paper records and the NSF CAREER award. Her work has been regularly funded through the National Science Foundation and Airforce (AFOSR).
Daniel Izquierdo
Daniel Izquierdo Cortazar is a researcher and one of the founders of Bitergia, a company that provides software analytics for open source ecosystems. Currently the chief data officer at Bitergia, he is focused on the quality of the data, research of new metrics, analysis, and studies of interest for Bitergia customers via data mining and processing. Daniel holds a PhD in free software engineering from the Universidad Rey Juan Carlos in Madrid, where he focused on the analysis of buggy developers activity patterns in the Mozilla community.
Daniel is an active member of the CHAOSS community at the D&I and GrimoireLab working groups as well as an active member of the InnerSource Commons. Griselda Cuevas
Griselda is the V.P. of D&I at the ASF and also a product manager in Google Cloud. She has 13 years of experience in a variety of industries, from oil and gas to cloud computing. She has a Masters in Operation Research and Data Science from UC Berkeley and is passionate about data engineering, open source technology, information architecture, diversity and inclusion in tech & Italian wines. In her spare time she reads and works on diversity and inclusion topics, specially around building frameworks that enable participation of under represented groups in tech. Mariam Guizani Mariam Guizani is a PhD student in Computer Science at Oregon State University. Her research area is in Human-Computer Interaction and Software Engineering. She studies inclusivity in open source environments with a focus on supporting cognitive diversity from the tool perspective. She holds a Master of Science in Computer Science from Oregon State University and was a recipient of the Fulbright scholarship in 2016.

Wednesday 09:00 UTC
building one active internal opensource community is crucial for InnerSource
Jerry Tan

InnerSource is the use of Apache Way within an organization. it needs both high-level support and internal engineers community support. Sometimes, high-level support is easy to get and implemented, but internal engineers' community support is much hard, it means culture shift. So building one active internal open source community is very important. As OSPO of Baidu, I adopt InnerSource inside Baidu for more than 4 years. I will talk about how I build the internal community in my company, including how I plan, how I implement it. I need to attract the target people, set small tasks to let them participate and contribute, and incentivize them. InnerSource is a long journey, but it is worth the investment.

Committer of apache.org, mozilla.org, gnome.org PPMC of apache brpc incubating project, InnerSourceCommon Foundation member, InnerSource advocator in China, more than 20 years of Open Source Experience

Wednesday 09:40 UTC
Apache Local Community (in Hindi language) [ALC Indore]
Priya Sharma

This talk will be part of Track prepared by ALC Indore, and *language for the talk will be Hindi* Apache Local Community (ALC) is an initiative by the Apache Community Development project. ALC comprises local groups of Apache (Open Source) enthusiasts, called an 'ALC Chapter'. For details please refer https://s.apache.org/alc The talk will include the details on introduction, Present State and next plans of ALC ## Introduction About ALC ALC Roles and Responsibilities Benefits of ALC How to apply to set up ALC Chapter Code of conduct ALC Resources Addition information Contact ALC ## Present State Current ALC Chapters (Indore, Beijing, Warsaw, Budapest, and others..) Activities and health of these chapters ## Beyond (Next Steps) Establishing new ALCs and future roadmap. How to participate in this initiative. More details on ALC can be found at -- https://s.apache.org/alc The following will be the take away from the session: -- What is ALC and how to participate in this initiative.

Core member, Apache Local Community Indore Chapter Contributor to Apache Projects since 2017, majorly contributed in OFBiz, and Community Development project.

Wednesday 16:15 UTC
Apache Local Community (ALC): Present & Beyond
Swapnil M Mane

Apache Local Community (ALC) is an initiative by the Apache Community Development project. ALC comprises local groups of Apache (Open Source) enthusiasts, called an 'ALC Chapter'. For details please refer https://s.apache.org/alc The session will be majorly on two topics: #1.) How the Apache Software Foundation provides the opportunity to flourish your idea. I shared the initial ALC idea to the community around mid-2019, from there with the great inputs from the community and mentors, we have given the shape to the idea. It is a great example, how the community can help you to transform and enhance your idea to match global standards. #2.) Introduction, Present State and next plans of ALC ## 2.1 Introduction About ALC ALC Roles and Responsibilities Benefits of ALC How to apply to set up ALC Chapter Code of conduct ALC Resources Addition information Contact ALC ##2.2) Present State Current ALC Chapters (Indore, Beijing, Warsaw, Budapest, and others..) Activities and health of these chapters ##2.3) Beyond (Next Steps) Establishing new ALCs and future roadmap. How to participate in this initiative. More details on ALC can be found at -- https://s.apache.org/alc -- https://s.apache.org/alc-code-of-conduct -- https://s.apache.org/alc-guidelines -- https://s.apache.org/alc-chapters -- https://s.apache.org/alc-reports -- https://s.apache.org/establish-alc-chapter The following will be the take away from the session: -- How community engagement can help in improvising and implementing your idea. -- What is ALC and how to participate in this initiative.

An open-source enthusiast, and promoter. -- Apache Software Foundation Member -- Apache Central Services / Editorial Member -- Founder & Chair, Apache Local Community (ALC) -- PMC Member, Apache Community Development, OFBiz, Roller -- Founder Vue.js Indore community Skilled in E-commerce, Order Management System, Omni-Channel, and PWA strategy. Strong information technology professional with the intensive experience of building enterprise-grade applications.

Wednesday 16:55 UTC
Growing with the Open-Source Community
Tomasz Urbaszek

During this talk, I want to share lessons I've learned as a young engineer contributing to an open-source project. Those include demystifying the stereotype of OSS contributors, "community over code" approach as well as understanding the life cycle and funding of projects. But the most important lesson is why young people should join open source communities early in their careers. They can gain tremendous experience which is quite often out of their reach when working on commercial projects. Also encouraging young people to join OSS project allow us as communities to validate our contribution guides and check if we create a really welcoming environment.

Tomek is a software engineer at Polidea and Apache Airflow committer. He is an open-source enthusiast and chapter lead of ALC Warsaw. Book and philosophy lover with a big interest in financial markets. Tomek is a maths graduate from Warsaw University of Technology.

Wednesday 17:35 UTC
Serve, Lead, Succeed the Open (mindful) Way to Prevent/Reverse Burnout in Boardrooms,
Prashant V. Joshi

Abstract: Open Source SW (OSS) community has been brilliant in bringing the leadership out of everyone to innovate, contribute and transform. Covid-19, has brought one more challenge to the OSS community.This unique experiential talk inspires and opens minds of new and seasoned OSS community members at large to become successful servant-leaders through self-care coping mechanisms to prevent and alleviate burnout in boardrooms, classrooms and home-rooms in the midst of this pandemic and beyond. Yes you can! === Description: This talk engages the audience with simple, practical, scientific, rational and original ideas. It uses open and mindfulness principles so that every mind opens up (body too!), and gets inspired towards self-transformation. Whether you are a seasoned OSS guru or a novice/curious aspirant, this talk is for you. Why? A closed mind is a dangerous thing that creates toxic leadership for oneself and others. “Misery loves company” is a saying we love to use. Data shows that Rudeness costs millions to companies. Burnout is officially a disease according to World Health Organization. Depression costs lives. In a 2019 World Happiness Report surveying 156 countries, Finland was #1 (home of some Open Source pioneers) while the US was #19. So what? Time to shift the paradigm. It is mid-2020 with a re-surging Covid-19 pandemic and it is about time to bring clarity to our vision (pun intended!) so “happiness loves company too” - becomes a new phrase to live by. “Rudeness is expensive, civility is NOT” is another line to live by too. Well, how, you ask? Through a short presentation filled with scientific data, we will define the science of leadership, outline unique attributes of servant leadership, and give examples of the same. We will end with a mindful experiential component to have fun and begin the science of self-transformation. Yes, we can transform the OSS community together with better (open=mindful) leaders, awesome innovation, funding, and quality of life for all. Thank you

Prashant V. Joshi M.A. M. Phil, E-RYT 500, C-IAYT, YACEP (public speaker, published author) is an electrical engineer and a computer scientist. He is an outcome-focused management & technology executive, open source evangelist/alliances-builder, educator, master coach/therapist and a social entrepreneur with over 30 years in the US with many global for-profit and non-profit initiatives. His mantra for success is Grow PBT (People, Business, Technology). Presently he is an executive advisor for an early-stage startup (Sukhi Inc) in 'culturally aware mental wellness'. He is also a Global Ambassador to a non-profit institution in India (one of the oldest Yoga Therapy Research/Rehab Center) for raising funds for expanding a rehab/research center for cancer and other life-style diseases. Most recently he was the Vice President of Global Alliances for MariaDB Foundation, an open source project founded by Monty Widenius (creator of MYSQL). Over the past 5 years Prashant has advised many early and mature startups with his big brand and PBT acumen. Prashant is a co-founder of Gurukul, LLC, A Science of Living Institution serving global communities with evidence-based yoga/holistic healing which is in its 20th year. In 2016 he co-founded Food Yogini for advocating eco-friendly foods and goods. He has brought unique leadership coaching, Yoga/wellness into boardrooms, classrooms and home-rooms over the past 25+ years in NYC, NJ, TX and globally. He is a published author and a motivational public speaker. He lives in Austin, TX with his wife Manju, daughters Veda and Illa. He loves sports and travel and one of his tag-lines is Billions Yet To Be Served... Education: EE w honors from Bombay University and Double Masters in Computer Science from CUNY Wellness Certifications: E-RYT 500 (experienced registered Yoga teacher w over 10,000 hours of teaching), C-IAYT (certified International Yoga Therapist (w over 5,000 hours of therapeutic practice), YACEP (Yoga Alliance Continuing Education Provider)

Wednesday 18:15 UTC
Lightweight Open Source
Issac Goldstand

Ever think about contributing to the Open Source world, but worried that - for some reason or another - it’s not up to par with playing with the “big boys and girls”? That’s BS! Come learn why *every* contribution in the Open Source world can be helpful! As an active participant in the Open Source community for over twenty years, I am constantly running into situations where prospective newcomers to the community feel daunted and undervaluating themselves and/or their contributions. In this session I’ll talk about the importance of that exact sort of small contribution in some of the biggest Open Source communities and projects out there. Because sometimes a sub-domain expert is *much* more vital than yet another domain expert.

Issac has been involved in the Web community for nearly 20 years. With a strong background in the Apache Web Server internals, and optimizing web applications, Issac continues to churn out highly optimized web applications in a variety of languages and servers, as well as mentoring teams of programmers to be as passionate about writing great software as he is. Today Issac is married with four kids, and is launching a start-up to chase his long time dream: turning smart homes into a day-to-day "taken for granted" reality. In his spare time, he still spends time volunteering in the tech community and mentoring hi-tech teams across a diverse range of languages and disciplines.

Wednesday 18:55 UTC
The Apache Way: Practical Open Source Project Management
Shane Curcuru

The Apache Way is useful for organizations and individuals to be more effective at working in distributed communities. Open source software does not necessarily mean open development - and true community-led open development is where the fun starts in working in FOSS! There are a lot more aspects to consider and areas to invest in as you move forward through the open source journey. These are just the starting points to work on. A key reminder: open source works best when you're working with softare that you actually use. Taking the time to choose which teams or projects that you open up or participate is well worth the investment to keep your team's efforts focused. Come learn the behaviors you can use to succeed at Apache!

Shane is founder of Punderthings℠ LLC consultancy, helping organizations find better ways to engage with the critical open source projects that power modern technology and business. He blogs and tweets about open source governance and trademark issues, and has spoken at major technology conferences like ApacheCon, OSCON, All Things Open, Community Leadership Summit, and Ignite. Shane is serving a seventh term as an elected Director of the ASF, providing governance oversight, community mentoring, and fiscal review for all Apache projects. Previously, shane served as VP Brand Management for the ASF for eight years, and wrote the trademark and branding policies that cover all 200+ Apache® projects, including assisting projects with defining and policing their trademarks, as well as negoitating agreements with various software vendors using Apache software brands. Otherwise, Shane is: a father and husband, a BMW driver and punny guy. Oh, and we have cats. Follow @ShaneCurcuru and read about open source communities and see his FOSS Foundation directory: http://ChooseAFoundation.com/

Thursday 16:15 UTC
The economics of vendor neutrality and vendor domination
Myrle Krantz

Game theory applied to open source can be used to explain how participants profit from open source, but existing models work from the assumption that all contributors receive the same benefit from the decisions made. They do not. For example: Some may benefit more when software is faster, while others benefit when it is more configurable. It is often necessary to choose between the two. What happens to the general social welfare captured and made available by an open source project when a narrow economic interest dominates its decision making?

Myrle Krantz is currently serving as the Treasurer for the Apache Software Foundation. She is a former board member for the Apache Software Foundation, conference chair for ApacheCon Europe in 2019, a member of the Diversity and Inclusion Initiative, and the Community Development Committee. She has served as VP for the core banking open source project Fineract. Myrle has her computer science degree from Rice University in Houston, and her MBA from the Rotterdam School of Management. Myrle is an American living in the Voreifel in Germany with her two daughters, a husband, and a hunting dog. She loves to read, and plays piano badly.

Thursday 16:55 UTC
Welcoming community strengthens the Apache Way
Jarek Potiuk

This talk is about making the Apache Airflow a more welcoming community, by applying more of the principles that are the core of Apache Way. This is the story of the changes that we implemented over the last few years as a group of committers and PMCs in Apache Airflow. When our team started to contribute to Apache Airflow, we realized how hard it was to start contributing to the project at the very beginning. While we became few of the most active community members (committers and PMCs) of Apache Airflow, we learned our ropes, but we have not forgotten that others have similar problems and from the very beginning we started to work on making it easier to become the member of the community on many levels. We started from improving the development environment, going through documentation improvements, implementing some best coding practices and CI automation around it, and ending at mentoring and communication guidelines. We would like to share with the other Apache projects some tips and learning on what you can apply to be a more welcoming project. This talk will be half-deep-down technical and half-soft-skills, talking about how both sides are needed in order to be more welcoming. There is a "Success at Apache" blog and Feathercast video about this subject - now is the time to tell some more details in a talk.

After more than 20 years of career in IT from a junior programmer to CTO of 60+ company, Jarek has chosen to continue his path as individual contributor. He got back from the half-technical, half-managerial path he has been following since, and with the vast experience in both technologies and business side of IT, as well as being organizer of 500+ attendees IT conference, Jarek's engineering skills are supplemented by an understanding of people, business, customers and partners, and with the strong understanding that relationships with people are the key to success in either of the roles. Jarek worked in many roles and many types of companies and he tried it all - from few people mobile payment startup, robotics + AI startup where he was a robotics engineer, working at software house as an engineer and Head of Technology, building and leading 60+ software house, Centre of Expertise expert at one of the biggest FMCG companies, and being Tech Lead Manager at Google, and currently - became one of the most active full-time committers and PMC members of one of the most popular Open-Source Workflow Orchestrator for Big Data - Apache Airflow. Jarek is an experienced technical team leader. Loves leading and motivating professional teams of developers, testers, IT admins, project managers, but only if he can actively participate in all of the things his people do. Patient mentor. Focused on achieving realistic deliverables with quality matching the expectations. Balancing well research and pragmatic approach, with a strong flair for innovations. Jarek likes to use his voice and for a good reason.

Thursday 17:35 UTC
How to help companies be the best open source participants possible
Stormy Peters

Companies are participating more and more in open source. Projects that figure out how to work most effectively with companies will benefit the most while maintaining their autonomy. Come discuss and learn the best ways to include companies in your open source software plans. Learn how to leverage the resources companies can bring to a project while maintaining your project's governance model. Learn how to keep companies in the loop and still hear all the individual voices. Learn how to accept resources without sacrificing autonomy. The speaker is experienced in both running Open Source Programs Office for large companies as well as leading open source software non-profits. This unique perspective to both sides allows her to bring some novel suggestions. Many of us have experience working with open source software projects and companies. This presentation will be a mix of real examples and audience discussion.

Stormy Peters is Director of the Open Source Programs Office at Microsoft. She works with people and teams across Microsoft to help make sure Microsoft uses and contributes to open source software in a way that makes it possible for the world to achieve more through open source software. Stormy is passionate about open source software and educates companies and communities on how open source software is changing the software industry. She is a compelling speaker who engages her audiences during and after her presentations. She has given keynotes at 4,000+ person events such as OSCON, PyCon and LinuxConf Australia as well as talks to small groups. You can find videos of her talks online. Before joining Microsoft, Stormy held leadership positions in open source and developer roles at Red Hat where she was head of the Community Leads, the Cloud Foundry Foundation where she was VP of Developer Relations and Mozilla where she led Developer Relations. Previously, she served as executive director of the GNOME Foundation and at OpenLogic where she set up their OpenLogic Expert Community. Stormy graduated from Rice University with a B.A. in Computer Science.

Thursday 18:15 UTC
Who pays for open source foundations?
Shane Curcuru

Open source sustainability is more than just individuals figuring out how to make a living off of open source. Have you ever wondered who actually pays for open source? ### Abstract Open source sustainability is more than just individuals figuring out how to make a living off of open source. Have you ever wondered who actually pays for open source? Not just developers, but the whole ecosystem around major open source projects, either at a FOSS Foundation, independent or an open core project at a company? The major software projects we all rely on are mostly hosted at Foundations like Apache, Eclipse, Linux, or Software Freedom Conservancy. Those foundations provide a wide variety of support to project communities, including legal and licensing assistance, trademark management, event support, and more. As non-profits, these foundations rely on donors and sponsors for all of their work. So who pays for all of this critical support for open source foundations? Come find out what companies are behind the popular open source foundations and major independent projects, and who's actually paying for all of the other support work that's done to keep the servers running, press releases coming, and license compliance work. Surprises are guaranteed; I know I was surprised when I realized how many different FOSS projects that Microsoft is an annual sponsor for, and what projects a few other companies supported with their cash.

Shane is founder of Punderthings℠ LLC consultancy, helping organizations find better ways to engage with the critical open source projects that power modern technology and business. He blogs and tweets about open source governance and trademark issues, and has spoken at major technology conferences like ApacheCon, OSCON, All Things Open, Community Leadership Summit, and Ignite. Shane is serving a tenth term as an elected Director of the ASF, providing governance oversight, community mentoring, and fiscal review for all Apache projects. Previously, shane served as VP Brand Management for the ASF for eight years, and wrote the trademark and branding policies that cover all 200+ Apache® projects, including assisting projects with defining and policing their trademarks, as well as negoitating agreements with various software vendors using Apache software brands. Otherwise, Shane is: a father and husband, a BMW driver and punny guy. Oh, and we have cats. Follow @ShaneCurcuru and read about open source communities and see his FOSS Foundation directory at http://ChooseAFoundation.com/

Thursday 18:55 UTC
A view from the ivory tower: Participating in Apache as a member of academia
Michael Mior

Academics in an ivory tower conjures images of people toiling away nicely insulated from many of the concerns of reality. While this has it's advantages, anyone who's tried to use a project written for a research paper under a deadline can attest that it doesn't always result in useful code. While completing my PhD, I found an Apache project that fit well with the work I was doing s I rolled up my sleeves to write some code to make it more useful for solving my own problems. I've since had the opportunity to join the project's PMC and now as a faculty member, I continue to find value in encouraging my own students to contribute to Apache projects. I'll discuss how academics and Apache projects can find mutual benefit in close collaboration.

Michael completed his Masters degree at the University of Toronto and received a PhD from the University of Waterloo. While completing his PhD, he began contributing to the Apache Calcite project and has since joined the Calcite PMC. He joined RIT as an Assistant Professor in 2018. His research revolves around schema design and management and data integration for non-relational data. He continues to look for opportunity for himself and his students to contribute to Apache projects.